Home ยป Eco friendly product could reduce cement industry’s carbon footprint.

Eco friendly product could reduce cement industry’s carbon footprint.

Eco friendly product could reduce cement industry’s carbon footprint.

Melbourne – 20 November 2008
1. Mid shot of cement mixing truck, pans to cement
2. Close up cement pouring out
3. Close up supervisor
4. Wide shot cement in machinery
5. SOUNDBITE( English ), Peter Dixon, Zeobond Cement:
“For every tonne of cement – that produces about one tonne of CO2. Now when you consider there’s two and a half billion tonnes of cement made every year, that’s a lot of CO2. Our technology, using waste materials, not new materials, reduces that by about 80 per cent.”
6. Various concrete slabs
7. Various cement production
8. Wide shot Professor Janine Van Deventer at Melbourne University
9. Close up cement being mixed in lab
10. Close up Professor Janine Van Deventor
11. Close up cement being poured into tub
12. SOUNDBITE ( English ), Professor Janine Van Deventer, E-crete Inventor, Melbourne University:
“We can make it feel just about the same, but in addition to that its got a high fire resistance, up to almost 1000 degrees centigrade (1832 degrees Fahrenheit) and its strongly acid resistant, which is very good, it also sticks to steel in a chemical way which means you get a stronger bond between the steel reinforcement and the concrete, which is very very good.”
13. Various cement production
Melbourne – 10 December 2008
14. SOUNDBITE ( English ), Lee Bernoth, Sustainability Manager, Sustainability Victoria:
“The key barriers for products such as E-crete is that it is new and it’s a risk to go first and use new products and that in itself is a real barrier, so its important to get this product out in the market
place and demonstrate it in some key areas so its tried and tested.”
15. Various Sustainability Victoria office
Melbourne – 20 November 2008:
16. Wide concrete production
16. Various concrete slabs
17. SOUNDBITE ( English ), Professor Janine Van Deventer, E-crete Inventor, Melbourne University:
“I made material in a laboratory sixteen years ago, it is only now that we really get to the level of being able to convince concretors to place this in the ground and where people are happy to produce large scale products from it. Its a long way to do that, its not a simple route.”
18. Close up cement being poured
19. Mid shot of Cement truck driving away
LEAD IN
For every tonne of concrete produced on the planet, nearly the same amount of Carbon Dioxide or CO2 is pumped into the atmosphere.
But now an Australian company has developed an Eco-friendly solution that could play a very big role in reducing the industry’s carbon footprint.
STORYLINE
While coal power plants are the world’s biggest producers of carbon dioxide, cement companies aren’t far behind.
Cement, or the concrete it forms, is one of the most consumed materials on the planet.
And over the next decade, global production is expected to double as construction increases in developing countries.
But an Eco-friendly cement, produced in this small factory in the Australian city of Melbourne, could hold the key to slashing those CO2 emissions significantly.
Peter Dixon is from Zeobond Cement. He explains that every tonne of cement produces a tonne of CO2 and that 2.5 billion tonnes of cement are made every year. The cement they produce however reduces that level by about 80%.
Unlike regular concrete, the chemical reactions that form this polymer-based alternative called E-crete, don’t require the burning of limestone, which is responsible for sixty per cent of the carbon
emissions from cement manufacture.
E-crete is made from the Ash waste left over from power stations. It’s mixed with slag – a waste product from the making of iron and steel – and a special chemical activator.

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